Questions For Child Treatment


 

When will my baby start getting teeth?

Babies typically begin teething at six months of age. Usually, the bottom lower front teeth erupt first, followed by the two upper front teeth. Children have twenty teeth compared to adults that typically have thirty-two. In general, a child will have erupted all of his or her teeth by 2-3 years of age.


How often do I need to bring my child to the dentist?

In general, checkups are recommended at a minimum of every six months in order to aid in the prevention of cavities and other dental problems. It is always better to diagnose a potential problem early on. Since every child has individual oral healthcare needs, the frequency of dental visits will vary as the situation necessitates. Regular visits keep children familiar with the dentist and dental professionals. These visits build confidence in children and are much more pleasant when the child is not forced to associate the dentist with emergency treatment due to tooth pain and dental neglect. Decay or breakdown of a tooth that is detected in the early stages is easier and less costly to treat.


How important are baby teeth since they are going to fall out anyway?

“Baby” teeth – also known as primary teeth – have three main functions. First, they allow children to chew. The importance of pain-free feeding directly relates to your child’s diet, nutrition, and overall health. Second, baby teeth are important for speech development. Third, baby teeth provide a pathway for permanent teeth to erupt in a timely way. Premature tooth loss from cavities or infections allows for remaining teeth to move into the empty space and ultimately cause crowding. Cavities on baby teeth can cause permanent teeth to have higher cavity susceptibility.


If my toddler has a cavity, should he or she get a filling?

The earlier a cavity is diagnosed and treated, the less invasive the overall treatment will be. Over time, cavities can spread if allowed and possibly lead to an infection. It is important to evaluate each situation on an individual basis to determine what is best for the child.


What are dental sealants and does my child need them?

Dental sealants are hard plastic-like materials that are placed into the grooves of the chewing surfaces of teeth in order to help prevent cavities. They work by blocking out the sticky, sugary foods and liquids that tend to get caught in the teeth. The application is fast and pain-free. Dental sealants are recommended based on the child’s diet, history of cavities, and overall anatomy of the teeth.

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